San Francisco Chronicle: Senate bill goes wrong way on toxic-chemical rules

The San Francisco Chronicle editors are weighing in on the Toxic Substances Control Act in an editorial published April 27, 2015. They’re coming out swinging on the right side of history– that is, in opposition to the industry-sponsored Udall-Vitter bill, and in support of the Boxer-Markey bill, which offers up REAL reform of TSCA. Full … Read more…

Study could reduce firefighter exposures to toxic chemicals

Being a firefighter has always required bravery and fire safety smarts. But fighting fires in today’s modern buildings, which are filled with chemicals, has increased the health risks to firefighters exponentially. Essentially, the chemical industry has made firefighters’ work environment even more dangerous and unsafe than it was 40 years ago. For decades, pounds of … Read more…

UCSF develops game-changing method to translate research on toxic chemicals and prevent disease

By David Tuller, Dr.PH. Everyone wants to know more than we currently do about the long-term effects of everyday exposures to toxic chemicals. Even obstetricians, who could be expected to have a handle on the science, report not knowing how to advise their pregnant patients, according to a recent survey led by colleagues at the … Read more…

Chemical safety bill too flawed to support (San Francisco Chronicle, 7/5/2013)

San Francisco Chronicle editorial echoes Breast Cancer Fund’s stance on the Chemical Safety Improvement Act.

Breast cancer ties to environment probed (San Francisco Chronicle, 2/27/2013)

News stories exploring the links between breast cancer and the environment are popping up all over the place. Researchers pose the important question: “How can we begin to find a cure if we don’t first know the cause?”

Study: Packaged food raises levels of bisphenol A (San Francisco Chronicle, 3/30/11)

Check out this front-page story from today’s San Francisco Chronicle about our BPA food packaging study: “Forgoing packaged foods such as canned soups and vegetables could dramatically lower levels of a hormone-disrupting chemical that has been linked to myriad health problems…”